SITE SEARCH

Feeding Guide for the First Year

Making appropriate food choices for your baby during the first year of life is very important. More growth occurs during the first year than at any other time in your child's life. It is important to feed your baby a variety of healthy foods at the proper time. Starting good eating habits at this early stage will help set healthy eating patterns for life.

Recommended feeding guide for the first year:

Do not give solid foods unless your child's physician advises you to do so. Solid foods should not be started before 4 months of age because:
  • breast milk or formula provides your baby all the nutrients that are needed to grow.
  • your baby is not physically developed enough to eat solid food from a spoon.
  • starting your baby on solid food too early increases the chance that he/she may develop a food allergy.
  • feeding your baby solid food too early may lead to overfeeding and being overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all infants, children, and adolescents take in enough vitamin D through supplements, formula, or cow's milk to prevent complications from deficiency of this vitamin. Your baby's physician can recommend the proper type and amount of vitamin D supplement for your baby.

Guide for Formula Feeding (0 to 5 Months)


AgeAmount of Formula
Per Feeding
Number of Feedings
Per 24 Hours
1 month2 to 4 ounces6 to 8 times
2 months5 to 6 ounces5 to 6 times
3 to 5 months6 to 7 ounces5 to 6 times

Consider the following feeding tips for your child:

  • When starting solid foods, give your baby one new food at a time - not mixtures (such as cereal and fruit or meat dinners). Give the new food for five to seven days before adding another new food. This way you can tell what foods your baby may be allergic to or cannot tolerate. Egg whites are more likely than egg yolks to cause an allergic reaction. Most physicians recommend that you wait until after one year to introduce whole eggs.
  • Begin with small amounts of new solid foods - a teaspoon at first and slowly increase to a tablespoon.
  • Begin with dry infant rice cereal first, mixed as directed, followed by vegetables, fruits, and then meats.
  • Do not use salt or sugar when making homemade infant foods. Canned foods may contain large amounts of salt and sugar and should not be used for baby food. Always wash and peel fruits and vegetables and remove seeds or pits. Take special care with fruits and vegetables that come into contact with the ground. They may contain botulism spores that cause food poisoning.
  • Infant cereals with iron should be given to your infant until your infant is 18 months old.
  • Cow's milk should not be added to the diet until your infant is 1-year-old. Cow's milk does not provide the proper nutrients for your baby.
  • Fruit juice (100 percent juice, without added sugar) can be given when your baby is able to drink from a cup (around 6 months or older).
  • Feed all food with a spoon. Your baby needs to learn to eat from a spoon. Do not use an infant feeder. Only formula and water should go into the bottle.
  • Avoid honey in any form for your child's first year, as it can cause food poisoning.
  • Do not put your baby in bed with a bottle propped in his/her mouth. Propping a bottle has been linked to an increased risk of ear infections. Once your baby's teeth are present, propping the bottle can also cause tooth decay. There is also a risk of choking.
  • Help your baby to give up the bottle by his/her first birthday.
  • Avoid the "clean plate syndrome. "Forcing your child to eat all the food on his/her plate even when he/she is not hungry is not a good habit. It teaches your child to eat just because the food is there, not because he/she is hungry. Expect a smaller and pickier appetite as the baby's growth rate slows around 1 year of age.
  • Infants and young children should not eat hot dogs, nuts, seeds, round candies, popcorn, hard, raw fruits and vegetables, grapes, or peanut butter. These foods are not safe and may cause your child to choke. Most physicians suggest these foods be saved until after your child is 3 or 4 years of age. Always watch a young child while he/she is eating. Insist that the child sit down to eat or drink.
  • Healthy infants usually require little or no extra water, except in very hot weather. When solid food is first fed to your baby, extra water is often needed.
  • Do not limit your baby's food choices to the ones you like. Offering a wide variety of foods early will pave the way for good eating habits later.
  • Fat and cholesterol should not be restricted in the diets of very young children, unless advised to by your child's physician. Children need calories, fat, and cholesterol for the development of their brains and nervous systems, and for general growth.

Feeding Guide for the First Year (4 to 12 Months)



Breastfeeding or Formula

4 to 6 Months
4 to 6 feedings per day or 28 to 32 ounces per day

7 Months
3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

8 Months
3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

9 Months
3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

10 to 12 Months
3 to 4 feedings per day or 24 to 30 ounces per day

Dry Infant Cereal with Iron

4 to 6 Months
3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

7 Months
3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

8 Months
5 to 8tbs. single grain cereal mixed with formula

9 Months
5 to 8tbs. any variety mixed with formula

10 to 12 Months
5 to 8 tbs. any variety mixed with formula per day

Fruits

4 to 6 Months
1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

7 Months
2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

8 Months
2 to 3tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

9 Months
2 to 4 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

10 to 12 Months
2 to 4 tbs., mashed or strained, cooked/2 times per day

Vegetables

4 to 6 Months
1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

7 Months
2 to 3tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

8 Months
2 to 3tbs., strained, mashed, soft/2 times per day

9 Months
2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

10 to 12 Months
2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

Meats and Protein Foods

7 Months
1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

8 Months
1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

9 Months
2 to 3 tbs. of tender, chopped/2 times per day

10 to 12 Months
2 to 3 tbs., finely chopped, table meats, fish without bones, mild cheese/2 times per day

Juices, Vitamin C Fortified

7 Months
2 to 4 oz. from a cup

8 Months
2 to 4 oz. from a cup

9 Months
2 to 6 oz. from a cup

10 to 12 Months
2 to 6 oz. from a cup

Starches

10 to 12 Months
1/4 - 1/2 cup mashed potatoes, macaroni, spaghetti, bread/2 times per day

Snacks

7 Months
arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers

8 Months
arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt

9 Months
arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans

10 to 12 Months
arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans, cottage cheese, ice cream, pudding, dry cereal

Development

4 to 6 Months
Make first cereal feedings very soupy and thicken slowly.

7 Months
Start finger foods and cup.

8 Months
Formula intake decreases; solid foods in diet increase.

9 Months
Eating more table foods. Make sure diet has good variety.

10 to 12 Months
Baby may change to table food. Baby will feed himself/ herself and use a spoon and cup.

Contact Information


Driscoll Children's Hospital
3533 S. Alameda Street
Corpus Christi, Texas 78411

(361) 694-5000
(800) DCH-LOVE or (800) 324-5683


For TTY Deaf Messaging Connect to TTY Interpretation by dialing
(800) 735-2989

Patients & Families

News

May is National Trauma Awareness Month

May 05, 2014
Remember to always wear your helmet!
CORPUS CHRISTI - According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration more children ages 5 -14 go to emergency rooms for bicycle related injuries than with any other sport, many are head injuries. It is important to keep your head safe and always wear a helmet when participating in a wheeled sport. Here are some tips from...
READ MORE

Driscoll's kidney transplant recipients come from all over South Texas for annual Reunion

April 28, 2014
CORPUS CHRISTI - On Saturday, Driscoll Children's Hospital will celebrate seven years of renal transplants with patients and their families at the annual Transplant Reunion. For nearly 10 years, Driscoll's Kidney Center has offered comprehensive kidney care to the children of South Texas, including transplantation, general nephrology...
READ MORE

Driscoll's Teddy Bear Hospital is a chance for patients to be the doctors

April 08, 2014
WHAT: Patients will be the doctors tomorrow during a Teddy Bear Hospital organized by the Stripes Child Life Program at Driscoll Children's Hospital. The event allows children to become more familiar with the medical equipment and procedures involved in their treatment. They'll choose their teddy bear, give it a...
READ MORE

April is Child Safety Month

April 01, 2014
Driscoll Children's Hospital's Injury Prevention Program team
CORPUS CHRISTI - Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children age one through 12 years old. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) crash data, in 2010 almost an average of two children were killed and 325 were injured each day. This fatality rate could be reduced...
READ MORE

Driscoll patients go to Spurs game courtesy of generous donors

March 28, 2014
WHAT: Five Driscoll Children's Hospital patients and their parents or guardians will gather at the hospital's lobby and depart for San Antonio to see a Spurs game as part of a live auction package purchased at this year's Fiesta de los Niños. Steve and Jessica Johnson of JSJ Services, Inc. have purchased this item...
READ MORE